What is Crohn’s Disease?

Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that may affect any segment of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. Symptoms often include abdominal pain, diarrhea (which may be bloody if inflammation is severe), fever, and weight loss.

While the causes of Crohn’s disease are unknown, it is believed to be due to a combination of environmental, immune, and bacterial factors in genetically susceptible individuals.

It results in a chronic inflammatory disorder, in which the body’s immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, possibly targeting microbial antigens.

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While Crohn’s is an immune-related disease, it does not appear to be an autoimmune disease (in that the immune system is not being triggered by the body itself). The exact underlying immune problem is not clear; however, it may be an immunodeficiency state.

About half of the overall risk is related to genetics with more than 70 genes having been found to be involved. Tobacco smokers are twice as likely to develop Crohn’s disease as nonsmokers. It also often begins after gastroenteritis.

Diagnosis is based on a number of findings including biopsy and appearance of the bowel wall, medical imaging and description of the disease. Other conditions that can present similarly include irritable bowel syndrome and Behçet’s disease.

Other complications outside the gastrointestinal tract may include anemia, skin rashes, arthritis, inflammation of the eye, and tiredness. The skin rashes may be due to infections as well as pyoderma gangrenosum or erythema nodosum. Bowel obstruction may occur as a complication of chronic inflammation, and those with the disease are at greater risk of bowel cancer.

There are no medications or surgical procedures that can cure Crohn’s disease. Treatment options are intended to help with symptoms, maintain remission, and prevent relapse. In those newly diagnosed, a corticosteroid may be used for a brief period of time to rapidly improve symptoms alongside another medication such as either methotrexate or a thiopurine used to prevent recurrence. Stopping smoking is recommended in people with Crohn’s disease. One in five people with the disease is admitted to hospital each year, and half of those with the disease will require surgery for the disease at some point over a ten-year period.

While surgery should be used as little as possible, it is necessary to address some abscesses, certain bowel obstructions, and cancers.

Checking for bowel cancer via colonoscopy is recommended every few years, starting eight years after the disease has begun.

Crohn’s disease affects about 3.2 per 1,000 people in Europe and North America. It is less common in Asia and Africa. It has historically been more common in the developed world. Rates have, however, been increasing, particularly in the developing world, since the 1970s.

Source – Wikipedia

Crohn’s Disease Organizations

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation We bring together the largest community of IBD patients in the country, and we engage them in the fight against Crohn’s & colitis.


Crohn’s and Colitis Canada To cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and improve the lives of children and adults affected by these chronic diseases.


EFCCA The European Federation of Crohn’s & Ulcerative Colitis Associations (EFCCA) is an organisation representing 39 national Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis patient associations.

What is Crohn’s Disease? Curated Articles

WebMD Crohn’s disease causes ulcers and inflammation in your digestive system. It’s similar to ulcerative colitis. The difference is that Crohn’s can affect different parts of your digestive tract.


Healthline Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease. As many as 780,000 Americans have the condition, according to the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation (CCF).


MedicineNet Crohn’s disease (sometimes called Crohn disease) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines.

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